Foto: George Stoica

The Tritech Triumvirate: Power, Prog and Passion

Last week I happened to be in Tromsø and by chance happened to hear of a metal concert taking place in Driv, on Saturday. Although I had never heard of the two bands before, Mindtech and Triosphere, I decided to check them out; after all, I wouldn’t miss an opportunity to discover some new music.

Text: Paula Scortaru

Having listened to some of their songs on Youtube before the concert, I couldn’t say that their music left any particular impression on me. However, the actual concert came as a pleasant surprise; they sounded much better than what I expected.

Photo: George Stoica
Photo: George Stoica

The concert took place on the (quite small) Isbjørn stage (nice name by the way). I particularly enjoyed the design on the floor, that trippy cosmic black hole. What also came as a surprise was the sound: I’ve been to many concerts held on small stages before and I can say that countless times the acoustics were not up to par. Not so here, and I’d like to give a shoutout to whomever handled the soundboard, they made great use of such a small enclosed space. Things came out punchy and less midscooped as they sound online, and that appealed to my low-end doom-y tastes.

Photo: George Stoica
Photo: George Stoica

I had listened to all sorts of metal, so Mindtech didn’t prove to be anything out of the ordinary. Their music is quite common, while their lyrics are something that teenagers would probably relate to: the sort of lyrics about pain and how life makes no sense and there’s no reason for anything anymore, etc. However, I soon forgot about the lyrics and focused on their music as a whole; they gave a nice, heavy 40-minute performance and the public seemed really into it. Standout song: Sons of God, which, unlike the Youtube version, came out as sludgy and deliciously heavy on the chorus.

Photo: George Stoica
Photo: George Stoica

Triosphere came up next, and just as with Mindtech, their music had nothing special in particular and their songs were quite similar; enough for me to find it hard to ever remember the name of any individual song. An occasional cymbal groove and some proggy flourishes were welcome, as were the more quiet, almost modal forays which unfortunately there were too few of. Their instrumental performance was great on the other hand, and Triosphere’s Marius Silver Bergesen, the man on the lead guitar, tore that sucker up like it was nothing. Another shoutout goes to Ida Haukland, a force of nature in her own right!

Though not a fan of the overall style of these bands, they did sprinkle enough pounding riffage to make even a Kylesa fan nod their head in appreciation, and their banter and chemistry with the crowd was undeniable. People felt good, the bands felt good and that’s really all you need to walk away from a concert with a smile on your face.

Photo: George Stoica
Photo: George Stoica
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